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  • Dr. Norbert Martin, DPT

The Best Running Drills and Exercises for Optimal Performance

Updated: Jun 20, 2023


Running form drills


Are you looking to enhance your running experience? Do you desire to run faster, smoother, and with improved efficiency? Are you longing for injury prevention and overall performance improvement? If you answered 'yes' to any of these questions, then you've come to the right place!


Running is not just a physical activity; it's a gateway to fitness, well-being, and happiness. However, running alone might not be sufficient to unlock your full potential as a runner. That's where running drills and exercises come into play. These specialized activities target different aspects of your running technique, such as posture, cadence, foot strike, arm swing, and hip extension. By incorporating these drills into your training program, you can enhance your coordination, balance, power, and endurance. Furthermore, they can assist in preventing and rectifying common running errors and bad habits that often lead to injuries.


But which running drills and exercises are the best for runners of all levels? How can you perform them correctly and safely? And how do you integrate them into your training program seamlessly? In this article, we'll provide you with evidence-based information and practical tips on how to improve your running form and technique using the most effective running drills and exercises. Additionally, we'll offer examples and suggestions on creating a personalized running drill and exercise routine.


Before we dive in, it's important to note that running drills and exercises should be tailored to your individual goals, fitness level, injury history, and preferences. Not all drills and exercises are suitable or beneficial for everyone. We strongly recommend consulting a physical therapist or an athletic trainer before starting any new running drill or exercise program. Their expertise can help assess your current condition, identify strengths and weaknesses, design a personalized plan, monitor your progress, provide valuable feedback, prevent injuries, and fuel your motivation.


Throughout this article, we'll cover three fundamental types of running drills and exercises: strength training, agility drills, and running form drills. By the end, you'll be equipped with the knowledge and insights to embark on your journey toward optimized running performance.


Let's get started!



Strength Training

Strength training is a type of exercise that involves using resistance to build muscle strength, power, and endurance. Strength training can benefit runners in many ways. According to a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials by Balsalobre-Fernández et al. (2016), strength training can improve running economy, which is the amount of oxygen you use to run at a given speed. Running economy is one of the key factors that determine your running performance. The better your running economy, the faster and longer you can run with less effort.

Strength training can also reduce your risk of injury by strengthening your muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones. This can help you withstand the impact and stress of running on different terrains and distances. Strength training can also enhance your muscle performance by increasing your force production, speed, and power. This can help you run faster during sprints, hills, and finish lines.

Strength training can include low to high intensity resistance exercises and plyometric exercises. Resistance exercises are exercises that involve lifting weights or using elastic bands or body weight to create resistance. Plyometric exercises are exercises that involve explosive movements that generate a lot of force in a short time, such as jumps and sprints.


Some examples of resistance exercises for runners are: Squats: Squats are one of the best exercises for strengthening your lower body muscles, especially your quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, and calves. Squats can also improve your hip mobility and stability. To perform a squat, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and hold a weight in front of your chest or on your shoulders. Keep your back straight and your core engaged. Bend your knees and lower your hips until your thighs are parallel to the floor or as low as you can comfortably go. Push through your heels and return to the starting position. Repeat for 8-12 repetitions.

  • Common errors: Letting the knees cave in, rounding the back, or lifting the heels off the floor.

  • How to correct them: Keep the knees in line with the toes, keep the chest up and the core tight, and keep the heels firmly planted on the floor.

  • Variations: You can make squats easier by using less weight or no weight at all. You can make squats harder by using more weight, holding the weight overhead or at arm's length, or doing single-leg squats.


Lunges: Lunges are another great exercise for strengthening your lower body muscles, especially your glutes, hamstrings, quadriceps, and calves. Lunges can also improve your balance and coordination. To perform a lunge, stand with your feet hip-width apart and hold a weight in each hand or on your shoulders. Take a big step forward with one leg and bend both knees until your front thigh is parallel to the floor and your back knee is almost touching the floor. Keep your torso upright and your core engaged. Push through your front heel and return to the starting position. Repeat with the other leg. Alternate legs for 8-12 repetitions per leg.


  • Common errors: Letting the front knee go past the toes, leaning forward or backward, or losing balance.

  • How to correct them: Keep the front knee over the ankle, keep the chest up and the core tight, and use a wall or a chair for support if needed.

  • Variations: You can make lunges easier by using less weight or no weight at all. You can make lunges harder by using more weight, stepping onto a higher surface or a step, or doing jumping lunges.


Deadlifts: Deadlifts are an excellent exercise for strengthening your posterior chain muscles, which include your glutes, hamstrings, lower back, and core. Deadlifts can also improve your posture and prevent lower back pain. To perform a deadlift, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and hold a barbell or dumbbells in front of your thighs. Keep your back straight and your core engaged. Hinge at your hips and lower the weight until it reaches just below your knees or as low as you can comfortably go without rounding your back. Squeeze your glutes and push through your heels to return to the starting position. Repeat for 8-12 repetitions.


  • Common errors: Rounding the back, lifting the head too high or too low, or jerking the weight up or down.

  • How to correct them: Keep the back flat and the neck neutral, keep the weight close to the body, and lift and lower the weight in a smooth and controlled manner.

  • Variations: You can make deadlifts easier by using less weight or a lighter barbell or dumbbells. You can make deadlifts harder by using more weight, lifting the weight from a lower position or a deficit, or doing single-leg deadlifts.


Calf Raises: Calf raises are a simple but effective exercise for strengthening your calf muscles, which are important for propelling you forward when you run. Calf raises can also improve your ankle mobility and stability. To perform a calf raise, stand with your feet hip-width apart and hold a weight in each hand or on your shoulders. You can also do this exercise on a step or a ledge for more range of motion. Lift your heels off the floor as high as you can and hold for a second. Lower your heels back to the floor or slightly below the edge of the step or ledge if using one. Repeat for 15-20 repetitions.

  • Common errors: Bouncing up and down, leaning forward or backward, or losing balance.

  • How to correct them: Keep the movement slow and controlled, keep the chest up and the core tight, and use a wall or a chair for support if needed.

  • Variations: You can make calf raises easier by using less weight or no weight at all. You can make calf raises harder by using more weight, doing single-leg calf raises, or doing jumping calf raises.



Some examples of plyometric exercises for runners are:

Jumps: Jumps are one of the best plyometric exercises for improving your explosive power and speed when you run. Jumps can also increase your bone density and prevent osteoporosis. To perform a jump, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly bent. Swing your arms back and bend your knees more to prepare for the jump. Swing your arms forward and jump as high as you can. Land softly on the balls of your feet and bend your knees to absorb the impact. Repeat for 10-15 repetitions.


  • Common errors: Landing with stiff legs, landing with flat feet, or jumping too far forward or backward.

  • How to correct them: Land with bent knees, land on the balls of your feet, and jump straight up and down.

  • Variations: You can make jumps easier by jumping lower or less frequently. You can make jumps harder by jumping higher or more frequently, jumping on one leg, jumping over an obstacle, or jumping with a weighted vest.

Sprints: Sprints are another great plyometric exercise that involves short bursts of maximal effort running for improving your speed and power when you run. Sprints can also improve your cardiovascular fitness and burn calories. To perform a sprint, find a flat and clear surface that is at least 50 meters long. Start from a standing or crouching position and sprint as fast as you can to the end of the surface. Slow down gradually and walk back to the starting point. Rest for 30-60 seconds and repeat for 5-10 repetitions.


  • Common errors: Starting too fast or too slow, leaning too far forward or backward, or swinging the arms across the body.

  • How to correct them: Start with a moderate pace and gradually increase your speed, keep your torso upright and your core tight, and swing your arms in sync with your legs.

  • Variations: You can make sprints easier by sprinting shorter distances or less frequently. You can make sprints harder by sprinting longer distances or more frequently, sprinting uphill or against the wind, or sprinting with a weighted vest or a parachute.

Hill Repeats: Hill repeats are a challenging but rewarding plyometric exercise for improving your strength, endurance, and speed when you run. Hill repeats can also improve your running form and technique by forcing you to run with a higher knee lift, a shorter stride, and a faster cadence. To perform a hill repeat, find a hill that is at least 100 meters long and has a moderate to steep incline. Start from the bottom of the hill and run up the hill as fast as you can. Use your arms to help you drive up the hill and keep your chest up and your core engaged. Slow down gradually and walk or jog down the hill. Rest for 30-60 seconds and repeat for 5-10 repetitions.

  • Common errors: Starting too fast or too slow, leaning too far forward or backward, or taking too long or too short steps.

  • How to correct them: Start with a moderate pace and gradually increase your speed, keep your torso upright and your core tight, and take quick and short steps.

  • Variations: You can make hill repeats easier by running up a less steep or shorter hill or less frequently. You can make hill repeats harder by running up a steeper or longer hill or more frequently, running up the hill backwards or sideways, or running up the hill with a weighted vest or a backpack.


Tips for strength training:

  1. Use proper form and technique to avoid injury and maximize results.

  2. Choose a weight that is challenging but manageable for you.

  3. Warm up before and cool down after each session.

  4. Rest for 48-72 hours between sessions to allow your muscles to recover and grow.

  5. Vary your exercises, intensity, volume, and frequency to prevent boredom and plateaus.

  6. Consult a physical therapist or a certified trainer if you need guidance or feedback.

A sample strength training program

A sample strength training program for runners could look something like this:

Monday: Squats (3 sets of 8-12 reps), Lunges (3 sets of 8-12 reps per leg), Calf Raises (3 sets of 15-20 reps), Jumps (3 sets of 10-15 reps)

Wednesday: Deadlifts (3 sets of 8-12 reps), Calf Raises (3 sets of 15-20 reps), Sprints (5-10 reps of 50 meters), Hill Repeats (5-10 reps of 100 meters)

Friday: Squats (3 sets of 8-12 reps), Lunges (3 sets of 8-12 reps per leg), Calf Raises (3 sets of 15-20 reps), Jumps (3 sets of 10-15 reps)


 a chart for a sample strength training program

Agility Drills

Agility training is a type of exercise that involves moving quickly and changing direction, speed, and balance. Agility training can benefit runners in many ways. According to a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials by Forster et al. (2022), agility training can improve pro-agility performance, which is a common test of change of direction (COD) ability. COD ability is one of the key factors that determine running performance in various situations, such as avoiding obstacles, overtaking opponents, or adapting to terrain changes. The better your COD ability, the faster and more efficiently you can run with less energy loss.

Agility training can also reduce your risk of injury by improving your joint stability, flexibility, and proprioception. Proprioception is the ability to sense the position and movement of your body parts. The better your proprioception, the more control you have over your movements and the less likely you are to fall or twist an ankle.

Agility training can include low to high-intensity drills that challenge your speed, coordination, and balance. Some examples of agility drills for runners are:


Side Shuffles: Side shuffles are an agility drill that works on your lateral movement and stability. Side shuffles can also strengthen your hips, thighs, core, and calves. To perform a side shuffle, stand with your feet hip-width apart and your knees slightly bent. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Shuffle to the right by taking small steps with your right foot followed by your left foot. Keep your feet parallel and do not cross them over. Shuffle for 10 meters or as far as you can comfortably go. Then shuffle to the left by stepping to the left with your left foot followed by your right foot. Repeat this pattern for 10 meters or as far as you can comfortably go. Do 10 repetitions per side for 2-3 sets.

  • Common errors: Taking too long or too short steps, crossing the feet over, or losing balance.

  • How to correct them: Keep the steps quick and consistent, avoid crossing the feet over, and swing your arms naturally across your body at chest level.

  • Variations: You can make side shuffles easier by shuffling shorter distances or less frequently. You can make side shuffles easier by shuffling shorter distances or less frequently. You can make side shuffles harder by shuffling longer distances or more frequently, shuffling with a resistance band around your ankles or knees, or shuffling with a weighted vest.


Grapevines: Grapevines are an agility drill that works on your lateral movement and coordination. Grapevines can also improve your hip mobility and flexibility. To perform a grapevine, stand with your feet hip-width apart and your knees slightly bent. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Step to the right with your right foot, then cross your left foot behind your right foot. Step to the right again with your right foot, then cross your left foot in front of your right foot. Continue this pattern for 10 meters or as far as you can comfortably go. Then grapevine to the left by stepping to the left with your left foot, then crossing your right foot behind your left foot. Step to the left again with your left foot, then cross your right foot in front of your left foot. Repeat this pattern for 10 meters or as far as you can comfortably go. Do 10 repetitions per side for 2-3 sets.

  • Common errors: Not keeping the knees slightly bent and the hips low, not moving the arms in sync with the legs, not stepping far enough to the side or crossing too close to the other foot, not looking straight ahead, and keeping the head up.

  • How to correct them: Maintain a slight bend in the knees and a low center of gravity throughout the movement, swing the arms naturally across the body at chest level, step out as far as you can to the side, and cross your feet at least a foot apart, look forward and keep your head aligned with your spine.

  • Variations: You can make grapevines easier by using larger or fewer cones or markers or by moving shorter distances. You can make grapevines harder by using smaller or more cones or markers or by moving longer distances. To use cones or markers, place them along the path of the grapevines to guide the direction and distance of your steps.


Skaters: Skaters are an agility drill that works on your lateral movement and power. Skaters can also improve your balance and stability. To perform a skater, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly bent. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Jump to the right with your right foot, landing softly on the ball of your foot. Swing your left leg behind your right leg without touching the floor. Swing your arms naturally across your body at chest level to help you balance and generate momentum. Jump to the left with your left foot, landing softly on the ball of your foot. Swing your right leg behind your left leg without touching the floor. Swing your arms naturally across your body at chest level to help you balance and generate momentum. Continue this pattern for 10 meters or as far as you can comfortably go. Repeat for 10 repetitions per side for 2-3 sets.

  • Common errors: Taking too long or too short jumps, crossing the feet over, or losing balance.

  • How to correct them: Keep the jumps quick and consistent, avoid crossing the feet over, and swing your arms naturally across your body at chest level.

  • Variations: You can make skaters easier by jumping lower or less frequently. You can make skaters harder by jumping higher or more frequently, jumping on one leg, jumping over an obstacle, or jumping with a weighted vest.


Ladder Drills: Ladder drills are one of the best agility drills for improving your footwork, speed, and coordination. Ladder drills involve moving through a ladder or a series of cones or markers on the ground with different patterns of steps. To perform a ladder drill, place a ladder or a series of cones or markers on the ground about 15 inches apart. Start from one end of the ladder or the first cone or marker and move through it with quick and light steps. Follow the pattern of steps that you have chosen for the drill, such as:


  1. One foot in each box: Step into each box with one foot, alternating left and right.

  2. Two feet in each box: Step into each box with both feet, one after the other.

  3. In-and-out: Step into the first box with your right foot, then step out with your left foot to the left side of the box. Step into the second box with your left foot, then step out with your right foot to the right side of the box. Continue alternating sides.

  4. Hopscotch: Hop into the first box with both feet together, then hop out with one foot on each side of the second box. Hop back into the third box with both feet together, then hop out with one foot on each side of the fourth box. Continue this pattern.

Repeat for 10-15 repetitions per drill for 2-3 sets.

  • Common errors: Taking too long or too short steps, touching the ladder or the cones or markers, or losing balance.

  • How to correct them: Keep the steps quick and consistent, avoid touching the ladder or the cones or markers, and use your arms to help you balance.

  • Variations: You can make ladder drills easier by using a longer or wider ladder or fewer cones or markers or by doing simpler patterns of steps. You can make ladder drills harder by using a shorter or narrower ladder or more cones or markers or by doing more complex patterns of steps.


Tips for Agility Training

  1. Use proper form and technique to avoid injury and maximize results.

  2. Choose a drill that is appropriate for your skill level and goal.

  3. Warm up before and cool down after each session.

  4. Rest for 48-72 hours between sessions to allow your muscles to recover and adapt.

  5. Vary your drills, direction, and distance to prevent boredom and plateaus.

  6. Consult a physical therapist or a certified trainer if you need guidance or feedback.

A Sample Agility Training Program

A sample agility training program for runners could look something like this:

Monday: Side shuffles (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Grapevines (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Skaters (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Ladder drills (10 reps for 2-3 sets)

Wednesday: Side shuffles (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Grapevines (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Skaters (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Ladder drills (10 reps for 2-3 sets)

Friday: Side shuffles (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Grapevines (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Skaters (10 reps per side for 2-3 sets), Ladder drills (10 reps for 2-3 sets)


Running Form Drills

Running form drills are exercises that focus on specific aspects of your running technique, such as posture, cadence, foot strike, arm swing, and hip extension. Running form drills can help you improve your running efficiency and performance by reducing unnecessary movements and energy waste. Running form drills can also help you prevent and correct common running errors and bad habits that can lead to injuries.

According to a systematic review and meta-analysis of 77 studies by Barnes and Kilding (2015), running form drills can improve running economy (RE), which is a measure of how efficiently a runner uses oxygen at a given speed. The authors found that RE is influenced by various biomechanical, physiological, and environmental factors. They also found that running form drills can improve RE by enhancing neuromuscular coordination and reducing braking forces.


Some examples of running form drills for runners are:

High Knees: High knees are a running form drill that works on your knee lift and cadence. High knees can also improve your hip flexion and mobility. High knees can also work the calves, which are important for running and jumping. To perform high knees, run in place or forward by lifting your knees as high as possible with each step. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Pump your arms in sync with your legs, moving them in a natural running motion with your elbows bent at 90 degrees and your hands relaxed. Land softly on the balls of your feet and keep a fast cadence. Do this drill for 20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets.


  • Common errors: Lifting the knees too low or too high, leaning back or forward, or slowing down the cadence, or swinging the arms across the body.

  • How to correct them: Keep the knees at a 90-degree angle, maintain a straight posture, keep a consistent cadence, and move the arms forward and backward.

  • Variations: You can make high knees easier by lifting the knees lower or less frequently. You can make high knees harder by lifting the knees higher or more frequently or holding dumbbells in your hands to add extra load and intensity to the exercise.


Butt Kicks: Butt kicks are a running form drill that works on your heel recovery and cadence. Butt kicks can also improve your hamstring and quad flexibility and mobility. To perform butt kicks, run in place or forward by kicking your heels up to touch your butt with each step. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Pump your arms in sync with your legs, moving them in a natural running motion with your elbows bent at 90 degrees and your hands relaxed. Land softly on the balls of your feet and keep a fast cadence. Do this drill for 20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets, with a 20 to 30-second rest between each set.


  • Common errors: Kicking the heels too low or too high, leaning back or forward, or slowing down the cadence, or swinging the arms across the body.

  • How to correct them: Keep the heels close to your butt, maintain a straight posture, and keep a consistent cadence, and move the arms forward and backward.

  • Variations: You can make butt kicks easier by kicking the heels lower or less frequently. You can make butt kicks harder by kicking the heels higher or more frequently, or holding dumbbells in your hands.


Heel Flicks: Heel flicks are a running form drill that works on your hip extension and power. Heel flicks can also improve your glute activation and strength. To perform heel flicks, run forward by flicking your heels up behind you at a 45-degree angle with each step. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Pump your arms in sync with your legs, moving them in a natural running motion with your elbows bent at 90 degrees and your hands relaxed. Land softly on the balls of your feet and keep a moderate cadence. You should avoid landing on your heels or toes, as this can cause injury or reduce your speed. Do this drill for 20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets.


  • Common errors: Flicking the heels too low or too high, leaning back or forward, or slowing down the cadence.

  • How to correct them: Keep the heels at a 45-degree angle behind you, maintain a straight posture, and keep a consistent cadence.

  • Variations: You can make heel flicks easier by flicking the heels lower or less frequently. You can make heel flicks harder by flicking the heels higher or more frequently, or holding dumbbells in your hands.

Skips: Skips are a running form drill that works on your vertical force production and power. Skips can improve your coordination and balance. Skips can also work the hip flexors, which are important for running and jumping. To perform skips, run forward by skipping with each step. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Pump your arms in sync with your legs, moving them in a natural running motion with your elbows bent at 90 degrees and your hands relaxed. Land softly on the balls of your feet and keep a moderate cadence. You should avoid landing on your heels or toes, as this can cause injury or reduce your speed. You should also avoid bouncing too high or too low, as this can waste energy or limit your range of motion. Do this drill for 20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets.


  • Common errors: Skipping too low or too high, leaning back or forward, or slowing down the cadence, or swinging the arms across the body.

  • How to correct them: Keep the skips at a comfortable height, maintain a straight posture, and keep a consistent cadence, and move the arms forward and backward.

  • Variations: You can make skips easier by skipping lower or less frequently. You can make skips harder by skipping higher or more frequently or holding dumbbells in your hands.



Strides: Strides are a running form drill that works on your speed and acceleration. Strides can also improve your running economy and confidence. To perform strides, run forward by gradually increasing your speed from a jog to a sprint over 50-100 meters. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Swing your arms in sync with your legs, moving them in a natural running motion with your elbows bent at 90 degrees and your hands relaxed. Your arms should swing forward and backward, not across your body. Land softly on the balls of your feet and keep a smooth and relaxed form. You should avoid landing on your heels or toes, as this can cause injury or reduce your speed. You should also avoid bouncing too high or too low, as this can waste energy or limit your range of motion. Slow down gradually and walk back to the starting point. Repeat for 5-10 repetitions.


  • Common errors: Increasing the speed too quickly or too slowly, leaning back or forward, or tensing up the muscles.

  • How to correct them: Increase the speed steadily and smoothly, maintain a straight posture, and keep a relaxed form.

  • Variations: You can make strides easier by increasing the speed slower or less frequently. You can make strides harder by increasing the speed faster or more frequently, adding an incline or decline to the distance, or wearing a weighted vest. An incline can increase the challenge for your quads and glutes as you accelerate uphill. A decline can increase the challenge for your hamstrings and calves as you control your speed downhill. A weighted vest can add extra load and intensity to the exercise.

Tips for Running Form Drills

  1. Use proper form and technique to avoid injury and maximize results.

  2. Start slowly and gradually increase your speed and intensity.

  3. Warm up before and cool down after each session.

  4. Rest for 30-60 seconds between drills

  5. Vary your drills, direction, and distance to prevent boredom and plateaus.

  6. Consult a physical therapist or certified trainer if you need guidance or feedback.

A Sample Running Form Drill Program

A sample running form drill program for runners could look something like this:

Monday: High knees (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Butt kicks (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Heel flicks (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Skips (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Strides (5 to 10 reps of 50 meters)

Wednesday: High knees (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Butt kicks (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Heel flicks (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Skips (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Strides (5 to 10 reps of 50 meters)

Friday: High knees (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Butt kicks (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Heel flicks (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Skips (20-30 seconds for 2-3 sets), Hill repeats (5 reps of 100 meters)






FAQs

Here are some frequently asked questions about running drills and exercises:

Q: How often should I do running drills and exercises?

A: It depends on your goals, fitness level, schedule, and preferences. But as a general guideline, you can do running drills and exercises 2-3 times per week on non-consecutive days.


Q: How long should I do running drills and exercises?

A: It depends on the type, number, intensity, and difficulty of the drills and exercises you choose. But as a general guideline, you can do running drills and exercises for 10-30 minutes per session.


Q: How should I warm up and cool down before and after running drills and exercises?

A: You should warm up before running drills and exercises by doing some light cardio, such as jogging, cycling, or skipping, for 5-10 minutes. You should also do some dynamic stretches, such as leg swings, arm circles, and torso twists, for 5-10 minutes. You should cool down after running drills and exercises by doing some static stretches, such as hamstring stretch, quadriceps stretch, and calf stretch, for 5-10 minutes. You should also do some foam rolling or massage to release any muscle tension or soreness.


Q: What are some common mistakes to avoid when doing running drills and exercises?

A: Some common mistakes to avoid when doing running drills and exercises are:

  • Skipping the warm-up or cool down

  • Using improper form or technique

  • Choosing a weight that is too heavy or too light

  • Doing too many or too few repetitions or sets

  • Doing the same drills and exercises every time

  • Ignoring pain or discomfort

  • Comparing yourself to others

Q: What are some benefits of doing running drills and exercises? A: Some benefits of doing running drills and exercises are:

  • Improving your running form and technique

  • Improving your running economy and performance

  • Improving your coordination, balance, power, and endurance

  • Preventing and recovering from common running injuries

  • Having more fun and variety in your running routine

Final Thoughts

Running drills and exercises are an essential part of any runner's training program. They can help you improve your running form and technique, which can lead to better performance, efficiency, and enjoyment. They can also help you prevent and recover from common running injuries, which can keep you healthy and happy.

In this article, we have provided you with evidence-based information and practical tips on how to improve your running form and technique with the best running drills and exercises. We have also given you some examples and suggestions on how to create your own running drill and exercise routine.

We hope this article has been helpful and informative for you. If you want to try these drills and exercises or learn more about them, we encourage you to do so. Remember to always warm up before and cool down after each session, use proper form and technique, rest between drills, vary your routine, and have fun!

Happy running!


References

  1. Balsalobre-Fernández, C., Santos-Concejero, J., & Grivas, G. V. (2016). Effects of strength training on running economy in highly trained runners: A systematic review with meta-analysis of controlled trials. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 30(8), 2361–2368. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001316

  2. Forster, J. W. D., Uthoff, A. M., Rumpf, M. C., & Cronin, J. B. (2022). Training to improve pro-agility performance: A systematic review. Journal of Human Kinetics, 85, 35-51. https://doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2022-0108

  3. Barnes, K. R., & Kilding, A. E. (2015). Running economy: measurement, norms, and determining factors. Sports Medicine-Open, 1(1), 1-15.


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